2012–13 Part III - Departmental Performance Report (DPR)

Canada Industrial Relations Board


2012–13


Departmental Performance Report


The Honourable Dr. K. Kellie Leitch, P.C., O.Ont., M.P.
Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women




Chairperson’s Message

Elizabeth MacPherson, Chairperson

I am pleased to present to Parliament and to Canadians the annual Performance Report of the Canada Industrial Relations Board (the CIRB or the Board) for the period ending March 31, 2013.

During the 2012–13 fiscal year, there was a decline in the volume of matters filed with the Board, with a 19% reduction in the number of applications filed. This represents not only a decrease from the number of applications filed in the previous fiscal year, but also the lowest number of applications filed in the past five years. A quick glance at the types of matters filed before the Board shows that certification applications and applications for reconsideration have decreased by almost half since the previous year. However, the number of duty of fair representation complaints has largely remained constant over the past year, and now represents a higher proportion of the Board’s overall workload.

This decline in workload has presented an opportunity for the Board to further improve its average processing time, reducing it to 168 days from 221 days in the previous fiscal year. Additionally, this past year proved to be the best since the 2009–10 fiscal year for resolving matters within a one-year period, with 89% of all matters received being processed within one year of receipt.

In the year ahead, the Board faces significant challenges and opportunities as it undertakes new responsibilities for the administration and interpretation of Part II of the Status of the Artist Act. I have made it a priority to reach out to stakeholders in the artistic community to ensure that the Board understands and is able to respond to their needs. Our Board has engaged in a review of the procedural regulations for matters filed pursuant to the Status of the Artist Act and is consulting the community with a set of proposed amendments. My objective is to make the transition as seamless and as positive as possible for all those affected.

The Board works extremely hard to respond to the needs of the community it serves. The credit for continuing to shorten the time it takes for a dispute to be resolved is to be shared among the Board’s staff, Members and Vice-Chairpersons, all of whom continually strive to find timely solutions that best serve the labour-management relations of the Board’s client community.

Elizabeth MacPherson
Chairperson




Section I: Organizational Overview

Raison d’être

The mandate of the Canada Industrial Relations Board (the CIRB or the Board) is to contribute to and promote a harmonious industrial relations climate in the federally regulated private sector through the impartial, effective and appropriate administration of the legislation governing labour and management in their representational and bargaining activities. The Board also contributes to Canada’s cultural community by promoting constructive professional relations between artists and producers in the federal jurisdiction. This in turn, provides better conditions of engagement for artists and a more stable, predictable workforce for producers. To achieve this mandate, the Board seeks to provide effective industrial relations solutions for the Canadian labour relations community in a fair and timely manner.

Responsibilities

The CIRB is an independent, representational, quasi-judicial tribunal responsible for the interpretation and application of the Canada Labour Code (the Code), Part I (Industrial Relations) and certain provisions of Part II (Occupational Health and Safety). Since April 1, 2013, the Board is also responsible for the administration and application of Part II of the Status of the Artist Act. This act establishes a framework for the conduct of professional relations between independent professional artists and producers within the federal jurisdiction, and most of its provisions are similar in nature to those contained in the Canada Labour Code.

Part I of the Code establishes the framework for collective bargaining, the acquisition and termination of bargaining rights, determination of unfair labour practices and protection of the public interest in the event of work stoppages affecting essential services.

The CIRB has jurisdiction in all provinces and territories with respect to federal works, undertakings or businesses in the following sectors:

  • Broadcasting
  • Chartered banks
  • Postal services
  • Airports and air transportation
  • Shipping and navigation
  • Interprovincial or international transportation by road, railway, ferry or pipeline
  • Telecommunications
  • Grain handling
  • Uranium mining and processing
  • Most public and private sector activities in the Yukon, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories
  • Some First Nations undertakings
  • Federal Crown corporations including, among others, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and the national museums)

The federal jurisdiction covers some 800,000 employees and approximately 12,000 employers which include enterprises that have a significant economic, social, and cultural impact on Canadians from coast to coast. The variety of activities conducted in the federally regulated sector, as well as its geographical spread and national significance, contribute to the uniqueness of the federal jurisdiction and the role of the CIRB.

The Board’s role is to exercise its powers in accordance with the Preamble and provisions of the Code, which state that Parliament considers “the development of good industrial relations to be in the best interests of Canada in ensuring a just share of the fruits of progress to all.” To that end, the Board aims to be responsive to the needs of the industrial relations community across Canada by emphasizing initiatives that build positive working relationships and support stable labour-management relations.

Departmental Organization

The Code provides that the Board is to be composed of the Chairperson, two or more full-time Vice-Chairpersons, not more than six full-time Members (of which not more than three represent employers and not more than three represent employees) and any other part-time Members (representing, in equal numbers, employees and employers) necessary to discharge the responsibilities of the Board. All are appointed by the Governor in Council: the Chairperson and the Vice-Chairpersons for terms not to exceed five years, the Members for terms not to exceed three years. The Board currently consists of the Chairperson, five full-time Vice-Chairpersons, and six full-time and two part-time Members. Information on the Board Members can be found on the Canada Industrial Relations Board Website.

The Chairperson is the chief executive officer of the Board and has supervision over and direction of the work of the Board, including:

  • the assignment and reassignment of matters that the Board is seized of to panels;
  • the composition of panels and the assignment of Vice-Chairpersons to preside over panels;
  • the determination of the date, time and place of hearing;
  • the conduct of the Board’s work;
  • the management of the Board’s internal affairs;
  • the duties of the staff of the Board.

The Board’s headquarters are located in the National Capital Region. Support to the Board is provided by the Executive Director, reporting directly to the Chairperson. The Executive Director is responsible for regional operations, case management, legal services, client and corporate services and financial services.

The Board has four regional offices located in Dartmouth, Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver, and two satellite offices, one in Ottawa and another in Winnipeg. These offices are staffed by labour relations professionals and case management teams. The regional offices report to the Executive Director in Ottawa.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture

Strategic Outcome

In pursuing its mandate, the CIRB seeks to achieve the following strategic outcome:

Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour-management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code

The CIRB’s strategic outcome is aligned with the government’s Economic Affairs and supports the government’s desired outcome of ensuring a Fair and Secure Marketplace through the impartial, effective and appropriate administration of the rules governing the conduct of employers and unions, in order to ensure stable labour-management relations and productive workplaces.

It should be noted that the CIRB, through the Management Resources and Results Structure amendment process and in consultation with the Treasury Board Secretariat, is in the process of amending the description of its strategic outcome to better reflect the new responsibilities of the CIRB pursuant to the Status of the Artist Act.

Program Alignment Architecture

Based on its legislated mandate, the CIRB has a single strategic outcome and two programs.

Program Alignement Architecture Diagram

[text version]

Organizational Priorities

During fiscal year 2012–13, the CIRB focused its efforts and resources on key priorities that were in direct support of its strategic outcome, with the objective of promoting and contributing to effective and stable industrial relations in the federally regulated private sector. Progress against those priorities is summarized in the table below:


Priority Type1 Strategic Outcome and Programs
Expeditious and fair resolution of applications and complaints Ongoing

This priority is linked to our sole strategic outcome:

Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour-management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code

and is also directly linked to our main program:

Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program

Summary of Progress
  • At fiscal year end, the CIRB’s performance indicators demonstrate that its case management activities resulted in improvements over previous years. The disposition rate continues to exceed the number of applications and complaints filed, and as a result, the number of matters awaiting determination has been reduced to a historic low. In 2012–13, the Board received 595 applications/complaints and disposed of 649, representing a disposition rate of 109%.
  • The Board reduced its average processing time for all matters coming before the Board to 168 days (i.e., less than 6 months). This represents an improvement of 24% over the previous year (168 vs. 221).
  • During the fiscal year, the Board completed the comprehensive review and amendment of its procedural regulations and adopted the new Canada Industrial Relations Board Regulations, 2012. The purpose of these amendments is to make the Board’s processes more clear, modern and practical.

Priority Type Strategic Outcome and Programs
Successful resolution of labour relations problems through appropriate dispute resolution mechanisms Ongoing

This priority is linked to our sole strategic outcome:

Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour-management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code

and is also directly linked to our main program:

Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program

Summary of Progress
  • The Board took, on average, 63 days to render written decisions. This is a slight increase over the previous year where, on average, the Board took 57 days to issue decisions; however, it remains well below the statutory requirement of 90 days.
  • The CIRB’s settlement rate for unfair labour practice complaints remained consistent with previous years at 48%. This was achieved by proactive intervention and effective mediation assistance on the part of the Board’s regionally based Industrial Relations Officers. Mediated settlements result in more timely and constructive outcomes for complainants and respondents.


Priority Type Strategic Outcome and Programs
An involved and well-informed labour relations community Ongoing

This priority is linked to our sole strategic outcome:

Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour-management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code

and is also directly linked to our main program:

Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program

Summary of Progress
  • In April 2013, the CIRB launched a revised Website with up-to-date information on the Board’s practices and procedures and with improved search capacities on its decisions database.
  • In its continuing efforts to be accountable to its users, the Board continued to publish semi-annual newsletters informing the client community of the Board’s activities and performance.


Priority Type Strategic Outcome and Programs
Enhanced electronic management capabilities Ongoing This priority is linked to our sole strategic outcome:

Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour-management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code

and is also directly linked to two programs:

Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program
and
Internal Services

Summary of Progress
  • The CIRB continued to actively participate in an initiative to procure a common case management system for small agencies and worked closely with PWGSC, TBS-CIOB and other SDAs to identify system requirements and develop a comprehensive approach to the procurement process that ensured SDAs’ business needs were being addressed.
  • Internal resources were realigned to permit greater focus on and development of strategies and processes to implement the use of electronic means of communications, including electronic filing.

Risk Analysis

The CIRB, as indicated in previous reports, is a low-risk agency. Financially, approximately four fifths of its $13.7 million operating budget in 2012–13 was expended on salaries and benefits. Of the remaining $3.1 million in Operations and Maintenance, 60% was spent on travel and professional services, primarily related to the processing of cases (e.g. travel to external hearings, temporary rental of hearing rooms, interpretation services and translation of Board decisions.)

The Board is a demand-driven organization in that its sole function is to respond to the matters that are referred to it by unions, employers, individual employees and the Minister of Labour. The Board’s workload is a function of many variables and is highly unpredictable in any given year.

It is in this context that the following risks have been identified in the Board’s planning documents and mitigating measures put in place to minimize their likelihood and impact.

Risk Risk Response Strategy Link to Program Alignment Architecture Link to Organizational Priorities

1. Processing Time

Unreasonable delays in processing matters and issuing decisions can negatively affect labour-management relations and cause significant problems for parties that need final resolution of their dispute.

  • This risk was identified in the 2012–13 RPP.
  • Through focused and sustained case management efforts, priority is given to matters in which a delay may pose significant adverse industrial relations consequences.
  • An expedited procedure is in place for the processing of certification applications.
  • A prima facie review process is in place for duty of fair representation cases in order to better assess the needs of individual cases and assign the appropriate resources. This has resulted in a significant reduction in the disposition time of these matters.
  • A review of the procedural regulations was completed and a new set of regulations was adopted and implemented that further improved the management of matters coming before the Board for determination.

This risk is directly linked to our sole strategic outcome:

Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour-management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code

and to our main program:

Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program

This risk is directly linked to the following organizational priority:

Expeditious and fair resolution of applications and complaints

2. Credibility

The Board’s ability to carry out its mandate would be negatively affected if the client community did not perceive it to be an effective, fair and unbiased dispute resolution agency.

  • This risk was identified in the 2012–13 RPP.
  • The Board strives to issue quality decisions that are based on sound legal and industrial relations principles to ensure stability and certainty amongst the client community. During the fiscal year, no decisions were overturned by the Federal Court of Appeal.
  • The Board also promoted transparency and accessibility by communicating its jurisprudence and performance results in a timely fashion through a variety of information dissemination methods.
  • The Board maintained ongoing communications with the client community through regular meetings with the client consultation committee and regional client groups.

This risk is directly linked to our sole strategic outcome:

Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour-management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code

and to our main program:

Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program

This risk is directly linked to the following organizational priorities:

Expeditious and fair resolution of applications and complaints;

An involved and well-informed labour relations community

 

3. Capacity to Deliver on Multiple Initiatives

The Board’s limited resources and size make it a challenge to build and retain specialized skills and knowledge in areas that are not central to the Board’s mandate but critical to meeting the governance expectations in various areas of corporate services.

  • The Board implemented a web-based externally managed service for the publication and distribution of its written decisions.
  • The Board reorganized its corporate services in order to establish greater capacity and a stronger support system in key areas.
  • The Board continued to actively participate in the steering committee responsible for the procurement of a shared case management system for small agencies.

This risk is directly linked to our sole strategic outcome:

Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour-management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code

and to the following program:

Internal Services

 

Summary of Performance

Financial Resources–Total Departmental ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–13 Planned Spending 2012–13 Total Authorities(available for use) 201213 Actual Spending(authorities used) 201213 Difference (Planned vs. Actual Spending)
12,994 12,994 13,685 12,786 899

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents–FTEs)
Planned 201213 Actual 201213 Difference 201213
104.0 91.6 12.4

Performance Summary Table for Strategic Outcome and Program ($ thousands)

Strategic Outcome: Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour-management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code

Program Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 201213) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–13 Actual Spending (authorities used) Alignment to Government of Canada Outcomes
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2012–132 2011–12 2010–11
Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program 9,356 9,356 9,905 9,758 9,609 9,104 9,841 9,468

Fair and Secure Marketplace

The CIRB promotes stable industrial relations within the industrial sectors that fall under federal jurisdiction, thus ensuring safe, fair and productive workplaces that contribute positively to the Canadian economy.


Performance Summary Table for Internal Services ($ thousands)
Internal Services Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 201213) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–13 Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2012–13 2011–12 2010–11
  3,638 3,638 3,649 3,609 4,075 3,682 3,858 3,819

Total Performance Summary Table ($ thousands)
Program and Internal Services Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates 201213) Planned Spending Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–13 Actual Spending (authorities used)
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2012–13 2011–12 2010–11
  12,994 12,994 13,554 13,367 13,685 12,786 13,699 13,287

The Board’s planned spending in 2013–14 has increased due to a permanent transfer of $300,000 for the administration of the Status of the Artist Act and a transition allowance of $200,000 for that year. In future years, planned spending will decrease due to the loss of the $200,000 in transitional funding.

The Board’s actual spending was affected by the cash out of severance entitlements in 2011–12 to several CIRB employees, pursuant to a new government policy regarding severance pay. The variance is also due to a reduction in spending on travel and professional services in 2012–13 compared to 2011–12, following a reduction in the number of cases requiring a hearing during the first quarter of the fiscal year.

Expenditure Profile

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

[text version]

The Board’s spending trend is stable, being affected in 2011–12 mainly by the cash out of severance entitlements in 2011–12 to several CIRB employees, pursuant to a new government policy regarding severance pay. The reduction in spending observed in 2012–13 follows a reduction in the number of cases requiring a hearing during this fiscal year. The increase for 2013–14 and subsequent years is explained by a permanent transfer of $300,000 for the administration of the Status of the Artist Act and a transition allowance of $200,000 for the year 2013–14.

Estimates by Vote

For information on the Canada Industrial Relations Board’s organizational votes and/or statutory expenditures, please see the Public Accounts of Canada 2013 (Volume II). An electronic version of the Public Accounts 2013 is available on the Public Works and Government Services Canada Website.


Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome: Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour-management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code
Performance Indicators Targets Actual Results
Number of applications/complaints resolved as a percentage of applications/complaints received during the year 100% 109%
Percentage of clients that are satisfied with the CIRB case management practices, measured over a three-year period with a client satisfaction survey 75% A survey will be conducted in 2013–14 to assess client satisfaction levels.

Program: Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program

The CIRB has only one key operational program—the Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program. Through this program, the CIRB resolves labour relations issues by exercising its statutory powers relating to the application and interpretation of Part I (Industrial Relations), and certain provisions of Part II (Occupational Health and Safety), of the Code. Activities include the granting, modification and termination of bargaining rights; the investigation, mediation and adjudication of complaints alleging violation of Part I of the Code; the determination of levels of services required to be maintained during a work stoppage; the exercise of ancillary remedial authority; the exercise of cease and desist powers in cases of unlawful strikes or lockouts; and the settlement of the terms of a first collective agreement.

Financial Resources–For Program Level ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–13 Planned Spending 2012–13 Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–13 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2012–13 Difference 2012–13
9,356 9,356 9,609 9,104 506

Human Resources (FTEs)–For Program Level
Planned 2012–13 Actual 2012–13 Difference 2012–13
77.0 65.4 11.6

Performance Results–For Program Level
Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
Targets Actual Results
Labour relations issues before the Board are resolved in a timely and consistent manner

Percentage of cases processed in less than one (1) year

75% 89%
  Percentage of CIRB decisions upheld by the Federal Court of Appeal 100% 100%
  Average length of time to render a decision from the date the Board reserves its decision 90 days 63 days

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Volume of Matters

The nature of the demand for Board services varies from year to year, depending on the state of the economy and other factors affecting the labour market. While Canada’s economic recovery remains fragile and its employment market is less dynamic than in the past, the Board has not seen this translate into increased activity or a higher number of incoming applications/complaints. To the contrary, there was a significant drop in the number of applications/complaints filed with the Board in 2012–13, a decrease of almost 20% from the previous year.

Unfair labour practice (ULP) complaints continue to represent the greatest number of cases, at 45.5% of all incoming matters in the fiscal year. Of these cases, duty of fair representation (DFR) complaints represent 30% of all cases while other ULP complaints represent 15% of cases.

With respect to the number of cases that were resolved, the Board disposed of more cases than it received and was able to further reduce the number of pending matters at the end of the fiscal year to 330 cases, its lowest level ever reported.

Processing Time

The time required to process a file—which includes opening, investigating, mediating, hearing, and deciding a case—continued to be the focus of the Board. During the fiscal year, the Board was able to further reduce its average case processing time to 168 days down from 221 days in the previous year.

One indicator that the Board considers indicative of its effectiveness is the number of cases that are processed within one year from the date of filing with the Board. In the last year, the Board was able to dispose of 89% of its cases within the 12-month period, its best result against this benchmark since it was established as a performance indicator in 2009–10.

Decision-Making Time

The Board issues detailed Reasons for decision in matters of broader national significance and/or significant precedential importance. In other matters, concise letter decisions help expedite the decision-making process, thereby providing more timely industrial relations outcomes for the parties involved. The Board also disposes of certain matters by issuing an order that summarizes the Board’s decision. The Board strives to provide timely and legally sound decisions that are consistent across similar matters in order to establish strong and clear jurisprudence. One component of the overall processing time is the length of time required by a Board panel to prepare and issue a decision following the completion of the hearing of a matter. A panel may decide a case without a hearing on the basis of written and documentary evidence, such as investigation reports and written submissions, or may defer the decision until further evidence and argument is obtained through an oral hearing.

In 2012–13, the CIRB issued 41 detailed Reasons for decision, 228 letter decisions and 177 orders, for a total of 446 written decisions.

Another approach to evaluating the Board’s performance on decision-making time is to use section 14.2(2) of the Code as a benchmark. This section requires that a panel must render its decision and give notice of it to the parties no later than ninety days after the day on which it reserved its decision or within any further period that may be determined by the Chairperson. Against this criterion, the Board was well within its target as the average decision-making time of disposed matters in 2012–13 was 63 days. The Board continues to demonstrate commitment and resolve in maintaining its rate of disposition to ensure that it does not allow a backlog of cases to re-occur.

Judicial Reviews

Another measure of the Board’s performance, as well as a measure of the quality and soundness of its decisions, is the frequency of applications for judicial review of Board decisions to the Federal Court of Appeal, and the percentage of decisions upheld as a result of these reviews. In this respect, the Board continues to perform exceptionally well. Of the 16 applications for judicial review that were dealt with by the Federal Court of Appeal in 2012–13, all of the Board’s decisions were upheld, for a success rate of 100%.

Program: Internal Services

The second program of the Board is to provide the internal support and administrative services required to carry out the Board’s main program. It consists of the groups of activities and resources that are administered to support the operational needs of the Board’s Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program and other corporate obligations of the CIRB, including Central Agencies’ requirements. These groups are: management and oversight services; human resources services; financial and administrative services (including facilities, material and procurement services); information management services; and information technology services.


Financial Resources–For Program Level ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary Expenditures (Main Estimates) 2012–13 Planned Spending 2012–13 Total Authorities (available for use) 2012–13 Actual Spending (authorities used) 2012–13 Difference 2012–13
3,638 3,638 4,075 3,682 393

Human Resources (FTEs)–For Program Level
Planned 2012–13 Actual 2012–13 Difference 2012–13
27 26.2 0.8

Performance Analysis and Lessons Learned

Internal corporate services make a critical contribution to the achievement of the sole main program. The Board is committed to continuously seeking effective and efficient internal service delivery and is working to address challenges in line with the Clerk of the Privy Council’s Public Service Renewal priorities. The CIRB strives to utilize its human, material and financial resources in the most economical, efficient manner to effectively support the delivery of the CIRB’s program and its corporate obligations. To this end, during the fiscal year, certain positions were abolished and resources were realigned to address new and evolving priorities. This will allow the CIRB to maximize its use of technology to better serve its client community.


Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Statements Highlights


Canada Industrial Relations Board
Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position (Unaudited)
For the Year Ended March 31, 2013
($ thousands)
  2012–13 Planned Results 2012–13 Actual 2011–12 Actual $ Change 2012–13 Planned vs. Actual) $ Change (2012–13 Actual vs. 2011–12 Actual)
Total expenses 17,637 16,660 16,336 877 424
Total revenues 0 0 0 0 0
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 17,637 16,660 16,336 877 424
Departmental net financial position -335 395 624 -730 -229

The Board’s spending trend is very stable; the variance between planned results and actual results for 2012–13 was caused by a lower-than-expected volume of cases.

The Board’s slight increase between 2012–13 and 2011–12 is mainly explained by salary increases due to the signing of new collective agreements.


Canada Industrial Relations Board
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (Unaudited)
As at March 31, 2013
($ thousands)
  2012–13 2011–12 $ Change
Total net liabilities 2,099 1,988 111
Total net financial assets 1,023 885 138
Departmental net debt 1,076 1,104 -28
Total non-financial assets 1,471 1,728 -257
Departmental net financial position 395 624 -229

The reduction in the Departmental net financial position is largely explained by the depreciation of the Board’s legacy non-financial assets, including computer software and equipment.

Financial Statements

The Board’s Future-oriented Financial Statements can be found on the Canada Industrial Relations Board Website.

Supplementary Information Tables

All electronic supplementary information tables listed in the 2012–13 Departmental Performance Report can be found on the Canada Industrial Relations Board Website.

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.


Section IV: Other Items of Interest

Organizational Contact Information

Toll-free: 1-800-575-9696
People who use TTY should place calls with the assistance of a Bell Relay Service operator at: 1-800-855-0511
Email: info@cirb-ccri.gc.ca
Website: http://www.cirb-ccri.gc.ca

Additional Information

- Organizational Information - Board decisions

- Statistical Reports

1. Type is defined as follows: previously committed to—committed to in the first or second fiscal year prior to the subject year of the report; ongoing—committed to at least three fiscal years prior to the subject year of the report; and new—newly committed to in the reporting year of the RPP or DPR.

2. In order to align with departmental authorities by Program, as presented in Vol. II of the Public Accounts, services provided without charge amounts for employer’s contribution to employee insurance plans, such as the Public Service Health Care Plan and the Public Service Dental Plan provided by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, accommodations provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada, workers’ compensation provided by Employment and Social Development Canada and legal services provided by the Department of Justice are not to be included in this figure. This information is presented in Departmental Financial Statements only.

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