2013–14 Part III - Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP)

Canada Industrial Relations Board




The Honourable Lisa Raitt
Minister of Labour




Chairperson’s Message

Elizabeth MacPherson, Chairperson

I am pleased to present to Parliament and to Canadians the Canada Industrial Relations Board’s Report on Plans and Priorities for the year 2013–2014.

The Canada Industrial Relations Board (the CIRB or the Board) has a mandate to encourage constructive labour-management relations between federally regulated employers and the unions representing their employees. In order to achieve this objective, the Board provides a variety of dispute resolution services. It adjudicates matters where necessary, but it also focuses on providing mediation assistance at all stages of a case, in order to proactively seek a resolution of matters that best meets the needs of the parties. The Board also plays a key role in supporting labour and management by engaging members of the industrial relations community in a continuing dialogue on key matters affecting their working relationships and ultimately, their workplaces.

In the past year, the Board’s case management activities have produced impressive results. Staff resolved many of the complaints that are filed with the Board to the satisfaction of all parties. The Board also disposed of more matters than it received, resulting in the reduction of the active case load to historic lows. The average processing time for all matters coming before the Board is now 169 calendar days (i.e., less than six months). These results indicate that the Board’s relentless efforts to deal with industrial relations matters in an effective and efficient manner have been successful.

In the year ahead, the Board faces significant challenges and opportunities as it undertakes new responsibilities for the administration and interpretation of Part II of the Status of the Artist Act. Every effort will be made to reach out to stakeholders in the artistic community to ensure that the Board understands and is able to respond to their unique needs. Our objective is to make the transition as seamless and as positive as possible for all those affected.

I look forward to moving ahead with our plans and priorities and our efforts to build positive working relationships in Canadian workplaces. I also wish to extend my deepest gratitude to the Board’s Vice-Chairs, Members and staff for their ongoing support and dedication. I am confident that the CIRB will continue to successfully meet the challenges ahead.

Elizabeth MacPherson
Chairperson




Section I: Organizational Overview

Raison d’être

The mandate of the Canada Industrial Relations Board (the CIRB or the Board) is to contribute to and promote a harmonious industrial relations climate in the federally regulated private sector through the impartial, effective and appropriate administration of the legislation governing labour and management in their representational and bargaining activities. To achieve this mandate, the Board seeks to provide effective industrial relations solutions for the Canadian labour relations community in a fair and timely manner.

Responsibilities

The CIRB is an independent, representational, quasi-judicial tribunal responsible for the interpretation and application of the Canada Labour Code (the Code), Part I (Industrial Relations) and certain provisions of Part II (Occupational Health and Safety). It was established in January 1999, to replace the previous Canada Labour Relations Board, through amendments to Part I of the Code.

Part I of the Code establishes the framework for collective bargaining, the acquisition and termination of bargaining rights, determination of unfair labour practices and protection of the public interest in the event of work stoppages affecting essential services.

The CIRB has jurisdiction in all provinces and territories with respect to federal works, undertakings or businesses in the following sectors:

  • Broadcasting
  • Chartered banks
  • Postal services
  • Airports and air transportation
  • Shipping and navigation
  • Interprovincial or international transportation by road, railway, ferry or pipeline
  • Telecommunications
  • Grain handling and uranium mining and processing
  • Most public and private sector activities in the Yukon, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories
  • Some First Nations undertakings
  • Federal Crown corporations (including, among others, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and the national museums)

The federal jurisdiction covers some 800,000 employees and their employers, and includes enterprises that have a significant economic, social, and cultural impact on Canadians from coast to coast. The variety of activities conducted in the federally regulated sector, as well as its geographical spread and national significance, contribute to the uniqueness of the federal jurisdiction and the role of the CIRB.

The Board’s role is to exercise its powers in accordance with the preamble and provisions of the Code, which state that Parliament considers “the development of good industrial relations to be in the best interests of Canada in ensuring a just share of the fruits of progress to all.” To that end, the Board aims to be responsive to the needs of the industrial relations community across Canada by emphasizing initiatives that build positive working relationships and support stable labour-management relations.

Status of the Artist Act Responsibilities

The 2012 Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act contained amendments to the Status of the Artist Act (the Act) that will, once proclaimed in force, make the Canada Industrial Relations Board the tribunal responsible for administering Part II of that Act. As a result, the CIRB will take on all the duties and responsibilities currently performed by the Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal (CAPPRT). It is expected that those provisions will be brought into force during the 2013–14 fiscal year and work has already begun to ensure a seamless transition.

The Act establishes a framework for the conduct of professional relations between independent professional artists and producers within the federal jurisdiction. The Act guarantees the right of artists to join associations that can represent their professional interests and the right to bargain collectively with producers for the purpose of reaching agreement on the minimum terms and conditions under which an artist will provide services to those producers. The Act also permits producers to form associations for the purposes of bargaining and entering into scale agreements. Although scale agreements set the minimum terms and conditions applicable in a particular artistic sector, artists are still free to negotiate individual contracts that provide more favourable rights and benefits.

Under this statutory regime, the Board will have the following responsabilities:

  • defining the sectors of cultural activity suitable for collective bargaining;
  • certifying artists’ associations to represent self-employed artists working in these sectors;
  • dealing with complaints of unfair labour practices and other matters brought forward by artists, artists’ associations or producers and prescribing appropriate remedies.

Departmental Organization

The Code provides that the Board is to be composed of the Chairperson, two or more full-time Vice-Chairpersons, not more than six full-time Members (of which not more than three represent employers and not more than three represent employees) and any other part-time members (representing, in equal numbers, employees and employers) necessary to discharge the responsibilities of the Board. All are appointed by the Governor in Council: the Chairperson and the Vice-Chairpersons for terms not to exceed five years, the members for terms not to exceed three years. The Board currently consists of the Chairperson, five full-time and one part-time Vice-Chairpersons, and five full-time and one part-time Members. Information on the Board members can be found on the Canada Industrial Relations Board’s Website.

The Chairperson is the chief executive officer of the Board and has supervision over, and direction of, the work of the Board, including:

  • the assignment and reassignment of matters that the Board is seized of to panels;
  • the composition of panels and the assignment of Vice-Chairpersons to preside over panels;
  • the determination of the date, time and place of hearing;
  • the conduct of the Board’s work;
  • the management of the Board’s internal affairs;
  • the duties of the staff of the Board.

The Board’s headquarters are located in the National Capital Region. Support to the Board is provided by the Executive Director, reporting directly to the Chairperson. The Executive Director is responsible for regional operations, case management, legal services, client and corporate services and financial services.

The Board has four regional offices located in Dartmouth, Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver, and two satellite offices, one in Ottawa and another in Winnipeg. These offices are staffed by labour relations professionals and case management teams. The regional offices report to the Executive Director in Ottawa.

Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture (PAA)

Strategic Outcome

In pursuing its mandate, the CIRB seeks to achieve the following strategic outcome:

Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code

The CIRB’s strategic outcome is aligned with the government’s Economic Affairs and supports the government’s desired outcome of ensuring a Fair and Secure Marketplace through the impartial, effective and appropriate administration of the rules governing the conduct of employers and unions, in order to ensure stable labour-management relations and productive workplaces.

Program Alignment Architecture

Based on its legislated mandate, the CIRB has a single strategic outcome and two programs.

Program Activity Architecture Diagram

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Organizational Priorities

Priority Type Strategic Outcome and Programs
Expeditious and fair resolution of applications and complaints Ongoing This priority is linked to our sole strategic outcome:

Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour-management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code

And directly linked to our main program activity:

Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program
Description
Why is this a priority?
Stable industrial relations contribute to Canada’s economic prosperity. By resolving matters in a timely and fair manner, the CIRB directly contributes to this objective.
Plans for meeting the priority
The CIRB will continue to focus its efforts on maintaining its current rate of disposition of new cases so as to ensure that a backlog does not recur. This will be achieved through effective case management and proactive mediation assistance at all stages of a case. The implementation of the new Canada Industrial Relations Board Regulations, 2012 which became effective on December 18, 2012, should also further improve the management of matters coming before the Board for determination.


Priority Type Strategic Outcome and Programs
Seamless transition to new responsibilities under the Status of the Artist Act  in order to ensure expeditious resolution of matters filed pursuant to that Act New This new priority may require that the CIRB modify its Program Alignment Architecture and its Strategic Outcome to better reflect its new responsibilities under the Status of the Artist Act

This priority is directly linked to the CIRB’s main program activity:

Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program
Description
Why is this a priority?
In Budget 2012, the federal government introduced amendments to the Status of the Artist Act making the CIRB the tribunal responsible for the administration of Part II of that Act. It is expected that these changes will result in annual recurring savings of $1.7 million.
Plans for meeting the priority
The CIRB is working diligently with colleagues from the CAPPRT to plan the necessary steps to implement the transition as soon as Cabinet adopts the Order-in-Council that will bring the amendments into force. The CIRB will undertake a review of the current Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal Procedural Regulations (CAPPRT Procedural Regulations) to develop proposals that align policies and procedures where possible with the Board’s current practices. The CIRB will also engage members of the community in a consultation process to seek their views and comments on proposed changes.


Priority Type Strategic Outcome and Programs
An involved and well-informed client community Ongoing This priority is linked to our sole strategic outcome:

Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour-management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code

And directly linked to our main program activity:

Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program
Description
Why is this a priority?
Client focused services continue to be an important objective of the federal government. Consultations with the client community will continue to be a priority for the CIRB to ensure that its plans and activities are aligned with the needs of the community.
Plans for meeting the priority
The CIRB will continue to develop and disseminate regular updates to the client community through its semi annual newsletter. It will also lead initiatives that bring together labour and management representatives in forums that allow for productive and positive dialogue on current economic challenges and opportunities. It is also the CIRB’s intention to reach out to members of the artistic community as it undertakes new responsibilities under the Act to ensure that the Board understands and responds to their specific needs.


Management Priority Type Strategic Outcome and Program
Enhanced electronic case management capabilities Ongoing This priority is linked to our sole strategic outcome:

Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour-management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code

And directly linked to two program activities:

Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program and Internal Services
Description
Why is this a priority?
It is essential to the CIRB’s ability to deliver on its mandate economically, efficiently and effectively, that it embrace and maximise new technologies with a view to improving document and information management and delivery of services.
Plans for meeting the priority
In conjunction with the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS), the CIRB will be assessing a limited number of COTS case management systems that will enable it to manage its case files electronically. Over the coming year, efforts will be deployed to develop strategies and business processes that will ensure the successful transition to electronic case management.

Risk Analysis

The CIRB is a low risk agency. Approximately four fifths (81%) of its $13 million in appropriated funds is expended on salaries and benefits. Of the remaining $2.5 million in Operations and Maintenance (O&M), more than half is spent on travel and professional services, and is largely related to the processing of cases, such as travel to external hearings, temporary rental of hearing rooms, interpretation services and translation of Board decisions. The Board adheres to Treasury Board policies for expenditures of its O&M budget. An audit conducted by the Office of the Comptroller General in the Spring of 2011 confirmed that the Board’s core controls over financial management are effective and generally executed in compliance with TBS policies and directives.

Unpredictable Case Load

The Board is a demand-driven organization in that the CIRB’s sole function is to respond to the matters referred to it by unions, employers, individual employees and the Minister of Labour.

The Board’s workload is a function of many variables, but the economic environment and the collective bargaining cycle are key determinants of the types of cases submitted to the Board. Organizational change and corporate restructuring driven by demands for improvements in productivity may lead to labour unrest and result in complaints of unfair labour practices (ULP).Corporate mergers and acquisitions tend to increase the demand for bargaining unit reviews and requests for the determination of a single employer and of a sale of business. Corporate bankruptcies and insolvencies frequently result in a loss of or decrease in the level of collectively bargained salary and employment benefits, with resultant increases in duty of fair representation (DFR) and bad faith bargaining complaints. The negotiation or renegotiation of collective agreements in areas essential to public health or safety creates demand for Board investigations and rulings on maintenance of activities issues.

The state of the economy can affect the absolute number of incoming applications and complaints and the nature of the demand for Board services. A significant increase in the incoming number of complex matters would severely affect the Board’s ability to meet its strategic outcome. The CIRB’s ongoing challenge in this context is to effectively monitor shifting workload demands and to reallocate its resources quickly where needed to ensure timely and seamless delivery of services across the country.

Processing Time

The Board’s largest strategic risk is associated with the number of applications and complaints it receives in a given year, combined with its ability to maintain a rate of disposition that prevents the accumulation of a backlog of cases. In order to mitigate this risk, priority is given to the processing and consideration of matters in which it appears that delay will pose a significant potential for adverse industrial relations consequences, or where other identifiable factors require a matter to be promptly addressed. In addition, the CIRB implemented new procedures for the processing of certification applications and DFR complaints over the last few years that had the effect of significantly reducing the disposition time of these types of matters.

The CIRB has recently completed a comprehensive review of its regulations and the new Canada Industrial Relations Board Regulations, 2012 (Regulations 2012)are now in force. It is expected that the new provisions will enhance the Board’s ability to effectively manage its cases and achieve its strategic outcome.

New Responsibilities

The federal government’s 2012 Jobs, Growth and Long-term Prosperity Act contained amendments to the Status of the Artist Act that will, once proclaimed in force, make the CIRB the tribunal responsible for administering Part II of that Act. As a result, the CIRB will take on all the duties and responsibilities currently performed by the Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal (CAPPRT). The additional workload is not expected to have a significant impact on the Board’s capacity to deal with its overall workload, but will require that new practices and procedures be put in place to deal with the unique nature of matters filed pursuant to the Act.

Although the artistic community has been generally positive about the proposed transition, there have been concerns expressed about the loss of expertise and specialized knowledge as the functions are transferred from the CAPPRT to the CIRB. To address these concerns and mitigate any risk associated with the transfer of responsibilities, the CIRB will retain some specialized staff that are currently with the CAPPRT. In addition, both agencies have begun the work necessary to ensure a seamless transition for the client community.

Credibility

The Board’s ability to carry out its mandate is predicated on the quality of its work and its reputation as an expert, impartial and effective dispute resolution agency. Another strategic risk to the Board involves the perception that the client community has of the Board and its work, and the impact that that could have on the Board’s credibility. In order to address this risk, the Board is committed to maintaining open communications with the client community through its Client Consultation Committee. It will continue to consult its clients on its performance and on the development of policies and practices.

The Board will also promote greater transparency and accessibility by communicating its jurisprudence and performance results in a timely fashion through a variety of information dissemination methods. It is also the Board’s intention to continue its outreach initiatives in order to ensure that it remains responsive to the needs of the labour-management client community. It will continue to distribute a semi-annual newsletter through which the community is kept informed of the Board’s performance with respect to processing times and any new initiatives or policies that may impact the processing of matters before the Board.

Capacity to Deliver on Multiple Initiatives

The Board, like other small departments and micro-agencies, continually faces pressure to respond to, or implement various government-wide corporate management initiatives. However, the CIRB’s limited resources are first and foremost dedicated to its core mandate of delivering fair and timely dispute resolution services to its client community. It is often a challenge to build and retain specialized skills and knowledge in areas that are not central to the Board’s mandate but critical to meeting the expectations of central agencies in various areas of corporate services.

The CIRB continues to seek horizontal opportunities and interdepartmental partnerships in order to achieve efficiencies and ensure it delivers on its mandate on a fiscally sound and sustainable basis. To this end, the CIRB has partnered with other SDAs and PWGSC on an initiative to identify and contract for a common case management system to replace its legacy system. However, new contracting policies have caused significant delays in the procurement process resulting in uncertainty around planning and long-term funding of a shared initiative for small departments and tribunals. The CIRB will evaluate its options going forward to determine whether it will be possible to pool the necessary resources in subsequent fiscal years to continue its commitment to a common system.

Planning Summary

Financial Resources (Planned Spending–$ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures (Main Estimates)
2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
13,554 13,554 13,367 13,333

Human Resources (Full-Time Equivalents–FTE)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
96.40 97 97


Planning Summary Table ($ thousands)

Strategic Outcome: Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour-management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code

Programs Actual Spending 2010–11 Actual Spending 2011–12 Forecast Spending 2012–13 Planned Spending Alignment to Government
of Canada Outcomes
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program 9,468 9,841 9,356 9,905 9,758 9,733 Fair and Secure Market Place

The CIRB promotes stable industrial relations within the industrial sectors that fall under federal jurisdiction, thus ensuring safe, fair and productive workplaces that contribute positively to the Canadian economy.
Internal Services 3,819 3,858 3,638 3,649 3,609 3,600  
Total Planned Spending 13,287 13,699 12,994 13,554 13,367 13,333  


Expenditure Profile

Departmental Spending Trend Graph

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Estimates by Vote

For information on our organizational appropriations, please see the 2013–14 Main Estimates publication.


Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcome

Strategic Outcome–Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour-management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code

When the Canada Industrial Relations Board receives an application or complaint, it is usually because there is some form of unresolved conflict or problem in the workplace that the parties involved have been incapable of resolving on their own. Through mediation or by issuing a decision, the Board effectively and directly contributes to its sole strategic outcome, namely, the resolution of labour relations issues. The impact of the work of the Board can be both broad-ranging and significant. The Board’s decisions and mediation efforts often affect, in very tangible ways, the working lives of thousands of Canadians, the economic position of leading Canadian corporations, and the general well-being of the Canadian public.

The Board also contributes, in an indirect but no less important manner, to effective industrial relations in the federal jurisdiction. Each time it issues a decision, the Board adds to its growing jurisprudence, which is widely disseminated to the industrial relations community. Clear and consistent jurisprudence provides an environment where potential litigants are more likely to resolve matters on their own, rather than to bring the matter before the Board. It is, however, difficult to ascribe a quantitative measure to this contribution to the labour-management relationship.

Strategic Outcome: Effective dispute resolution services that support constructive labour-management relations in sectors regulated by the Canada Labour Code
Performance Indicators Targets
Number of applications/complaints resolved as a percentage of applications/complaints received during the year 100%
Percentage of clients that are satisfied with the CIRB case management practices, measured over a three-year period with a Client Satisfaction Survey 75%

Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program

The CIRB has only one key operational program—the Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program. Through this program, the CIRB resolves labour relations issues by exercising its statutory powers relating to the application and interpretation of Part I (Industrial Relations) and certain provisions of Part II (Occupational Health and Safety) of the Code.

The typical activities that are conducted by the Board include:

  • the granting, modification and termination of collective bargaining rights;
  • the investigation, mediation and adjudication of alleged unfair labour practice complaints to ensure that collective bargaining between employers and unions is conducted fairly and in good faith;
  • determination of the levels of services required to be maintained during a work stoppage to ensure the protection of the health or safety of the Canadian public;
  • the prompt consideration of situations in which illegal work stoppages are alleged;
  • assistance to companies and unions to help them resolve the labour relations implications of corporate mergers and acquisitions, including the determination of appropriate bargaining unit structures and representation rights.

Financial Resources ($ thousands)
Total Budgetary
Expenditures
(Main Estimates)
2013–14
Planned Spending
2013–14
Planned Spending
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
13,554 13,554 13,367 13,333


Human Resources (FTEs)
2013–14 2014–15 2015–16
67,65 69 69


Expected
Results
Performance
Indicators
Targets
Labour relations issues before the Board are resolved in a timely and consistent manner

Percentage of cases processed in less than one (1) year

80%

Percentage of CIRB decisions upheld by the Federal Court of Appeal

100%
Average length of time to render a decision from the date the Board reserves its decision 90 days

Planning Highlights

The Board’s foremost priority remains the efficient and effective delivery of its statutory mandate while being both transparent and accountable in its decision making process.

Within this context, the Board’s main operational priorities in the coming year are to: maintain the momentum of the past few years and continue to dispose of cases in an efficient and timely manner; ensure a seamless transition as it undertakes new responsibilities for the administration and interpretation of Part II of the Status of the Artist Act; and continue with its formal and informal consultations and engagement with the client community.

Case Processing Times

The variety and complexity of the issues facing federally regulated employers and unions require the Board to judiciously apply a wide range of knowledge and skills in diverse industrial relations, labour law and administrative law contexts. The impact of the work of the Board can also be broad-ranging and significant. Typical issues of continuing concern to the Board include:

  • the acquisition and exercise of collective bargaining rights, and the promotion of sound labour-management relations in a fair and transparent manner;
  • the need to ensure that collective bargaining between employers and unions is conducted fairly and in good faith;
  • determination of the levels of services required to be maintained during a work stoppage to ensure the protection of the health and safety of the Canadian public;
  • the prompt consideration of situations in which illegal work stoppages are alleged;
  • the need to assist companies and unions in resolving the labour relations implications of corporate mergers and acquisitions—including the determination of appropriate bargaining unit structures and representation rights.

Recent enhancements to the Board’s case management activities have produced impressive results. Concerted efforts by Members and staff have allowed the Board to dispose of more matters than it received, resulting in a reduction of the number of pending cases to a historic low. In addition, the time required to process a file—which includes opening, investigating, mediating, hearing, and deciding a case—has been reduced significantly. The average processing time for all matters coming before the Board currently stands at 169 days, or less than six months, and 90% of all matters are disposed of within a year of being filed with the Board.

To further improve its performance results, the Board will continue to emphasize mediation in order to help parties find alternative solutions to their dispute without the need for an adjudicated decision. The CIRB plans to continue to proactively offer mediation services by both the regional staff and Board members at all stages of a complaint.

Also, in consultation with the client community, the Board recently completed a comprehensive review of its Regulations. The amendments, contained in the Canada Industrial Relations Board Regulations, 2012, came into force on December 18, 2012. It is the Board’s view that the new provisions will serve the Board and the labour relations community well in ensuring the effective processing of matters requiring determination by the Board.

In the coming year, the Board will focus its efforts on revising its information circulars and developing practice notes that will facilitate the communication and dissemination of policies and procedures to the client community.

New Responsibilities–Status of the Artist Act

In Budget 2012, the federal government introduced amendments to the Status of the Artist Act (the Act), making the CIRB the tribunal responsible for the administration and interpretation of Part II of that Act. As a result, the CIRB will take on all the duties and responsibilities currently performed by the Canadian Artists and Producers Professional Relations Tribunal (CAPPRT). It is expected that these statutory amendments will be brought into force during the 2013–14 fiscal year, and the CIRB is working diligently with the staff of the CAPPRTto plan the necessary steps to implement transitional plans.

With this new mandate, the CIRB will contribute to Canada’s cultural community by promoting constructive professional relations between artists and producers in federal jurisdiction. This, in turn, provides better conditions of engagement for artists and a more stable, predictable workforce for producers. This contribution is critical to a vibrant Canadian culture and its economic benefits to the national economy.

Although these are new responsibilities for the CIRB, the functions and expertise involved are very similar to those needed to fulfill its current responsibilities under the Canada Labour Code and provide an opportunity to streamline and improve the collective bargaining framework in the federal jurisdiction.

When the amendments are proclaimed in force, the CIRB will make it a priority to deal with the cases that are currently pending before the CAPPRT and that have been delayed due to a lack of quorum. The Board will ensure that those cases are processed expeditiously and heard on a priority basis.

The CIRB will also undertake a review of the current CAPPRT Procedural Regulations to develop proposals that align policies and procedures where possible with the Board’s current practices. The CIRB will also engage the community in a consultation process to seek their views and comments on proposed changes.

Client Outreach

The CIRB makes it a priority to keep its client community involved and well-informed on the Board’s performance and activities. A client consultation workgroup is in place and has been particularly useful in recent years as the Board reviewed its practices and procedures and engaged in a full review of its Regulations.

Recognizing that the Board needs to be responsive to the client communities it serves, the CIRB will continue to engage their representatives in various initiatives to seek their views and ensure that the work of the Board responds to the needs identified by the community. The CIRB will continue to develop and disseminate regular updates to the labour relations community through its newsletters. It will also reach out to members of the artistic community through various forums to ensure the transfer of responsibilities from the CAPPRT to the CIRB is well understood and to solicit their views on the needs of their constituency.

The Board will also support labour and management representatives in their work towards constructive work relationships by engaging members of the industrial relations community in a continuing dialogue on key matters affecting their workplaces through a national conference on industrial relations.

Internal Services

The second program activity of the Board, which would not exist without the first program, is to provide the internal support and administrative services required to carry out the Board’s main program. These services consist of the groups of activities and resources that are administered to support the operational needs of the Board’s Adjudicative and Dispute Resolution Program and other corporate obligations of the CIRB, including Central Agency requirements. These groups are: management and oversight services; human resources services; financial and administrative services (including facilities, materiel and procurement services); information management services; and information technology services.


Financial Resources ($ thousands)
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15
3,638 3,638 3,638


Human Resources (FTEs)
2012–13 2013–14 2014–15
28.75 28 28


Section III: Supplementary Information

Financial Highlights

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position

Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Operations
For the Year (ended March 31)
($ thousands)
  $ Change Forecast
2013–14
Estimated Results
2012–13
Total expenses 1,543 17,970 16,427
Total revenues - - -
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 1,543 17,970 16,427
Departmental net financial position 83 568 485


Future-Oriented Condensed Statement of Financial Position
For the Year (ended March 31)
($ thousands)
  $ Change Forcast
2013–14
Estimated Results
2012–13
Total net liabilities (60) 1,717 1,776
Total net financial assets 10 813 802
Departmental net debt (70) 904 974
Total non-financial assets 13 1,471 1,459
Departmental net financial position 83 568 485

Future-Oriented Financial Statements

The Board’s Future-oriented Financial Statements can be found on the Canada Industrial Relations Board’s Website.

Supplementary Information Table

The electronic supplementary information table listed in the 2013–14 Reports on Plans and Priorities can be found on the Canada Industrial Relations Board’s Website

Tax Expenditures and Evaluations Report

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication. The tax measures presented in the Tax Expenditures and Evaluations publication are the sole responsibility of the Minister of Finance.


Section IV: Other Items of Interest

Organizational Contact Information

Toll-free: 1-800-575-9696
People who use TTY should place calls with the assistance of a Bell Relay Service operator at: 1-800-855-0511
Email: info@cirb-ccri.gc.ca
Website: http://www.cirb-ccri.gc.ca

Additional Information

- Organizational Information - Board decisions

- Statistical Reports

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